McKie Meriwether Obelisk Denounced

According to recent news reports, this monument has come before the North Augusta City Council. The audacious sentiments carved upon it glorify the Hamburg Massacre, an ugly racial incident that paved the way for a century-long Jim Crow regime in South Carolina.

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Schultz Hill Cemetery

Hamburg burials came up during the recent talk in Edgefield. I think many people have heard about a Hamburg cemetery in North Augusta, somewhere behind ‘the auto glass place’. Schultz Hill Cemetery does exist, and yes it is kind of behind Sunny Solutions Window Tinting.

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Sign at the end of the driveway from Carolina Springs Road, with Brad Cunningham who over many years has made something happen at the Bedford Cemetery in Augusta.

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Duke Bernhard’s 1825 Visit

Lafayette’s 1824-1825 ‘Friend of the Nation’ tour of America was the most sensational event of the decade. Lafayette went out of his way to pass through almost every state of the Union, in a giant loop starting in the Northeast, through the South, to New Orleans, upriver to St. Louis, and up the Ohio back to where he started. Crowds cheered him wildly at every place along the way. Lafayette, refusing no invitation, probably shook almost that many hands. He visited Hamburg and Augusta, unfortunately his secretary’s record is skimpy. Of course most of their journals were lost months later in the Ohio River when their riverboat hit a snag and sank in the middle of the night.

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Newspapers

Old newspapers take a lot of careful reading, which is probably not for everyone. But they are are a great – maybe even the best place to discover local history. Shultz appears regularly in both the Augusta Chronicle and the Edgefield Advertiser with Sheriff’s sales of Hamburg property, reports of Hamburg anniversary celebrations, and  melancholy articles by Shultz condemning his latest injuries (or outlining a new plan to escape them).

Newspapers

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Cotton to Charleston

Augusta existed to collect cotton, and get the cotton to a seaport. The most available seaport for Augusta was Savannah, 231 river miles away. Hamburg existed to collect cotton, Augusta’s cotton if possible, and get the cotton to a South Carolina seaport. That was Hamburg’s drumbeat, to keep South Carolina commerce at home, which was part of the deal for support from the state legislature. So Hamburg boats routinely sailed right past Savannah, and beat their way another 101 miles behind the sea islands to Charleston.

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Steamboat and Rail routes from Hamburg to Savannah. The sea islands route from Savannah to Charleston is only my guess. From 1833 Tanner Map of SC, Library of Congress rr002990

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Holes In the Head

In Random Recollections of a Long Life, the priceless Edwin J. Scott plainly states that Shultz took his life in his hands after a court ruling against his ownership of the bridge. “In a fit of desperation… he attempted to commit suicide by discharging a loaded pistol in his mouth, but it happened to range upwards and outwards, so that the load came out between his eyes, frightfully mutilating him for the time, and leaving indelible marks of the powder in his face, yet, strange to say, he recovered, with his eyesight unimpaired….

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